The Great American Clothing Hall of Fame

For FREEWHEELERS, both the brand name and the label,  as an icon of the brand, are a part of our clothing.  However, while expressing the atmosphere of the U.S. through clothing,  there are several brands which require “Really Existed Brand.”  The four brands introduced here are special lineup recreating charm  of the brands with their real trademarks.  They are difficult to be expressed by other means.  We hope you enjoy the high degree of perfection that can be portrayed  by only FREEWHEELERS.

Leathertogs TRADE MARK

Leathertogs TRADE MARK Jacket

Leathertogs TRADE MARK Jacket

Among motorcycle jacket lovers, “Leather Togs” is known as “truly ultimate.” The products were made in a town near Boston from 1920s to 40s, and every jacket was custom-ordered. Its luxurious use of materials, high functionality and creative design, adding to the small-quantity production, are suited to be called the ultimate. However, the brand had disappeared soon after World War II. Therefore the details of the brand remain unknown.

Peter's TAILOR MADE

Peter's TAILOR MADE Jacket

Peter's TAILOR MADE Jacket

If the ultimate brand in the east of the vintage leather jackets before World War II is Leather Togs, its western counterpart should be “Peter's” of San Francisco. This brand is famous for its unique lapels called “Aviator Style.” There are also only a small numbers are remained, therefore, the whole picture has not still been clarified. At the same time, however, such mysterious factors contribute to deepen its attraction with the superfine horse hide.

Ironalls

Ironalls coverall

Ironalls coverall

“Don't say Overalls – Say Ironalls” is the slogan embossed on the button of “Ironalls,” a workwear brand. All we know about the company is that it dates back to pre-World War II. Except for it, nobody knows about the precise date of its production, the history of the company and types of the item, which means “Ironalls” is a phantom brand being wrapped in mystery. Having listened to the slogan above, however, their extraordinary confidence can be seen without examining its elaborate details.

STIFEL

STIFEL coverall

STIFEL coverall

“STIFEL,” developed from a dye-house, was a fabric manufacturer founded in 1835 by J. L. Stifel, a German immigrant to America. Their patterned indigo cloth called “Wabash Stripe” was released in the early 20th century, which made them very famous. The materials were manufactured in the special process that used a way of printing patterns on indigo fabrics with cylinders. It gives a unique atmosphere to the workwear.